Liz Scharnetzki, PhD

Research Coordinator II

Research Interests

  • Stigma in Health Care
  • Health Disparities
  • Social Determinants of Health

Dr.Scharnetzki is a Research Coordinator II at CORE. Dr. Scharnetzki completed her PhD in Experimental Social Psychology at the University of Vermont.

Prior to working in the health services domain, Dr. Scharnetzki’s research focused primarily on understanding how social contextual factors affect the representation, performance, and persistence of stigmatized groups. In her doctoral studies, Dr. Scharnetzki examined women’s experiences with social identity threat within STEM fields. Before joining CORE, Dr. Scharnetzki worked at Vermont’s Agency of Human Services, developing policy research projects aimed at promoting social capital within Vermont’s criminal justice system. Dr. Scharnetzki’s other prior positions include serving as a lecturer at universities and colleges in both California and Vermont, and working as a Research Technician at one of the NIH Building Infrastructure Leading to Diversity (BUILD) Initiative sites. Dr. Scharnetzki brings to CORE extensive training in quantitative research and a passion for promoting equity in the delivery of health care.

Ben-Zeev, Avi & Scharnetzki, Liz & K. Chan, Lann & Dennehy, Tara. (2012). Hypermasculinity in the media: When men “walk into the fog” to avoid affective communication. Psychology of Popular Media Culture,1, 53-61. 10.1037/a0027099.

Liz Scharnetzki, MA

Research Associate II

Research Interests

  • Research Methods and Evaluation
  • Shared Decision Making
  • Social Determinants of Health

Liz Scharnetzki is a Research Associate II at CORE and a Doctoral Candidate in Experimental Psychology at the University of Vermont. Liz graduated summa cum laude from San Francisco State University, with a Bachelor’s Degree in Psychology and a Master’s Degree in Psychological Research.

Prior to working in the health services domain, Liz’s research focused primarily on understanding how social contextual factors affect the representation, performance, and persistence of stigmatized groups. In her doctoral studies, Liz examined women’s experiences with social identity threat within STEM fields. Before joining CORE, Liz served as the Lead Research Analyst at the Vermont Department of Corrections. In this role, Liz developed policy research projects that aimed to promote social capital within Vermont’s criminal justice system. Liz’s other prior positions include serving as a lecturer at universities and colleges in both California and Vermont, and working as a Research Technician at one of the NIH Building Infrastructure Leading to Diversity (BUILD) Initiative sites. Liz brings to CORE extensive training in quantitative research, strong project management skills, and a passion for promoting equity in the delivery of health care.

Ben-Zeev, Avi & Scharnetzki, Liz & K. Chan, Lann & Dennehy, Tara. (2012). Hypermasculinity in the media: When men “walk into the fog” to avoid affective communication. Psychology of Popular Media Culture,1, 53-61. 10.1037/a0027099.